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In connection with the moderator elections, we are holding a Q&A thread for the candidates. Questions collected from an earlier thread have been compiled into this one, which shall now serve as the space for the candidates to provide their answers. Not every question was compiled - as noted, we only selected the top 8 questions as submitted by the community, plus 2 pre-set questions from us.

As a candidate, your job is simple - post an answer to this question, citing each of the questions and then post your answer to each question given in that same answer. For your convenience, I will include all of the questions in quote format with a break in between each, suitable for you to insert your answers. Just copy the whole thing after the first set of three dashes. Oh, and please consider putting your name at the top of your post so that readers will know who you are before they finish reading everything you have written.

Once all the answers have been compiled, this will serve as a transcript for voters to view the thoughts of their candidates, and will be appropriately linked in the Election page.

Good luck to all of the candidates!


As a moderator, your votes become binding. Actions you used to take like flagging, reviewing, closing, and deleting will take effect immediately without any input from any other users or moderators. How will you adapt the way you currently flag and vote to deal with this change?

While M&TV has a large userbase and many visitors, the meta participation is relatively low and discussions are usually held within a small active core group. Do you see this as a problem? If yes, how would you try to improve the situation as a moderator?

How willing are you to commit time to this site every day to ensure that everything is seen by at least one mod in a relatively decent amount of time?

How you are going to handle spoiler complaints? People here have submitted many complaints about spoilers and a new user can give a big spoiler very clearly. So how are you going to handle this?

In what way do you feel that being a moderator will make you more effective as opposed to simply reaching 10k or 20k rep?

How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

A new user has arrived and doesn't really understand the way the Stack Exchange system is supposed to work. They're complaining that people keep editing their posts and a roll back war has started on a question that they've asked. You need to step in and moderate the situation. What actions do you take?

This site generates a lot of identification questions. The general consensus for a while has been to keep them, but that we need to enforce some quality rules on them. What is your personal opinion on the identification questions we receive on this site?

What current policies do you believe are too strictly enforced (either by mods or the community)? Which do you believe are not enforced strictly enough?

  • 1
    So my favourite ones made into the list. – Ankit Sharma Feb 10 '15 at 8:16
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    Great to see so many people putting themselves forward like this, but the candidates should know that their answers in this questionnaire will have a huge influence on my vote, so please take the time to answer it. – Walt Feb 12 '15 at 13:52
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My name is Napoleon Wilson (but don't ask me why), and here are my answers:

As a moderator, your votes become binding. Actions you used to take like flagging, reviewing, closing, and deleting will take effect immediately without any input from any other users or moderators. How will you adapt the way you currently flag and vote to deal with this change?

Being a moderator comes with a certain responsibility and representation. However, flagging, reviewing and closing should already be done with the highest responsibility by any user. I only flag, and delete-vote when the situation is absolutely clear to me and will thus still continue to do this, just more effectively now. However, close-voting sometimes can have far less clearly defined rules which are prone to a slight bit of proper judgement by each individual. This doesn't mean one is to freely close-vote anything without thinking about the consequences, but that there are margins for certain questions wherein a reasonable consideration can be made by each user individually. The fact that 5 users have to agree on this makes this a viable democratic mechanism.

Now when a single vote is completely binding you have to be completely sure that it is perfectly aligned with the rules of the site and have to take personal responsibility for this, especially when closing it right away without any other users having the chance to evaluate it. This means that in certain situations where it isn't entirely clear, I'd rather leave the decision process to the community, at least at the beginning, possibly still helping with comments and pointers to relevant meta discussions. This doesn't mean I'll refrain from close-voting out of a fear to take responsibility but that I would deem it more appropriate for the community to reach a conclusion in unison in such marginal cases rather than a moderator making the judgment call right from the start.

While M&TV has a large userbase and many visitors, the meta participation is relatively low and discussions are usually held within a small active core group. Do you see this as a problem? If yes, how would you try to improve the situation as a moderator?

I tend to see this as a problem, since on the one hand it sometimes results in a lack of the necessary critical mass to make important decisions and on the other hand it might look like the site is ruled by a distinctive clique whereas it should actually be ruled by everyone. Add to this that low meta participation isn't a particularly good sign of an engaging userbase concerned about the site.

However, there are IMHO only small steps that can help to tackle this. Whenever a user is dissatisfied with something (say, a closed question), encourage them to bring it to meta or participate in a possibly already existing discussion on the matter. On the other hand important meta discussions might more often be made 'featured' in the community bulletin for main site users to notice that there is something going on behind the scenes that requires their attention.

Likewise some more community building efforts might help to rise user awareness of the community as a whole and in turn inspire them to engage more in those rather maintenance tasks and care about the development of the site. The most obvious things coming to mind are challenges, or a blog, or things as simple as encouraging people to join chat. While the more serious community building efforts necessarily require existing community contribution, I'm always eager to help with such things from the technical and organizational side.

How willing are you to commit time to this site every day to ensure that everything is seen by at least one mod in a relatively decent amount of time?

I already commit time to this site practically every day and a significant part of that time is moderation, so I don't see a big problem in this regard if site activity doesn't downright explode in the near future. I usually check into the site over the whole day till night, sometimes more and sometimes less, but always at least a few times during the day, skimming over new questions and review tasks.

How you are going to handle spoiler complaints? People here have submitted many complaints about spoilers and a new user can give a big spoiler very clearly. So how are you going to handle this?

First of all, we have in our statute that except for question titles spoilers are allowed. I will thus make any effort to remove them from question titles but am not too inclined on enforcing spoiler hiding in questions/answers if it wasn't the intent of the original author. Rather on the contrary, if I notice that spoilers are used to a degree where they deface a post into a plain yellow block, I might try to improve them by reducing spoiler markup to a minimum, yet respecting the OP's desire to not disclose everything. In addition to that, some time ago a user proposed to hide spoilers for unrelated material (i.e. not the movie asked about) if requested and I think this is a good idea. So if there are spoiler complaints in this regard by other users, I will try to improve that.

In what way do you feel that being a moderator will make you more effective as opposed to simply reaching 10k or 20k rep?

A 20k user is already pretty effective. The day to day work is mostly consisting of edits and the occasional close-vote or flag. The former is already perfectly doable with even far less than 10k rep and the latter is also not too ineffective once enough users contribute. However, close-voting and deleting entirely inappropriate stuff can be done much faster without having to wait for 4 or 2 other people to chime in. It also helps greatly with more maintenance-oriented tasks, like deleting old inactive ID questions or cleaning up comments, something which normal users can't do at all. In addition to that, it also helps with the rarer extraordinary events and their technical organization, be that challenges, blogs, chat events or larger one-time site maintenance undertakings. Those are rarer in occurrence but usually require more than just trusted user privileges to be handled effectively.

How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

First of all, I'd assess the nature of those flags and arguments and if they are indeed to be seen negatively. In either case I'd try to calm down the situation by my own comments. If a pattern becomes apparent there is however not much that could and should be done apart from judging each individual discussion anew. Afterall it is the internet and in the same way as people might not always be the politest, there are also enough misunderstandings and easy offenses. That doesn't mean flags are to be ignored in those cases, but that any possible misunderstandings are to be cleared.

If a user really continues to show inappropriate behaviour despite a positive content-wise contribution, one can only try to address him directly and remind him that it doesn't do good to the site, which he'll hopefully be interested in after having given so many useful contributions to it. If all else fails, a suspension is the last line of defense and to be used when really necessary, but this of course comes with the danger of repelling that user completely from the site. We had such an event in the past where an avid user and great contributor went postal, colloquially speaking, and ultimately abandoned the site completely (though, without even letting it go as far as a suspension) and this was surely not a good thing for this site. But apart from constructive discussion there's usually not so much that can and should be done there.

How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

First of all, I'd ask the respective moderator about the reasons for his decision if not obvious from the comments. If I really strongly disagree I'd try to reason with him and if we can't come to a conclusion (be it me or him bowing down or a compromise), the obvious choice is a meta discussion and taking the community to help make a decision. While that might slightly undermine all the moderators' authority when they're publicly arguing about something, it is better than leaving a major argument about a site policy unresolved and afterall moderators are also just (faulty) human agents of the community consensus.

A new user has arrived and doesn't really understand the way the Stack Exchange system is supposed to work. They're complaining that people keep editing their posts and a roll back war has started on a question that they've asked. You need to step in and moderate the situation. What actions do you take?

First of all, I'll first try to calm down the situation in comments along with assessing each of the users' standpoints. There are situations where edits have to be done and where new users need to understand how the site works and that posts aren't entirely their own and this understanding has to be helped by politely guiding the user to the tour and to meta if necessary. But there are also situations where the rules leave some more room for authorial control by the original asker and an editor might have gone too far. This also has to be addressed constructively. But whoever is more right and whoever's edit is to "win" (or a compromise between both edits), the new user has to be guided to an understanding of the intricacies of the site. If that fails however due to an unwillingness to adapt to the site's workings, more serious measures are in order. If the question is by all means not maintainable in an appropriate form due to repeated rollbacks then it might have to be deleted or the user even temporarily suspended after a respective warning if he poses active harm to the site.

This site generates a lot of identification questions. The general consensus for a while has been to keep them, but that we need to enforce some quality rules on them. What is your personal opinion on the identification questions we receive on this site?

First of all, my personal (and possibly quite extreme) opinion is that those questions have nothing to give to this site and are a burden for it, even more so they are the biggest and most dangerous problem the site has to fight with. There might be the occasional good one but overall they are a steady (and rising) stream of uninteresting clutter. They have nearly zero long-term information value and you won't ever look into an ID question that has an accepted answer. Add to this that, in contrast to each and every other kind of question, they are not salvageable content-wise without the help of the original asker. But even worse, they make this site look like a mere quiz show and actively dilute the brand of what this site is about. On the long term their viral nature will only result in a further rise of those questions and an exodus of avid users and interesting non-ID questions, which will ultimately contribute to the qualitative and thematic deterioration of this site, turning it into a place lacking any appeal to people interested in engaging questions and in the broader development of the site.

So much to my own rather pessimistic opinion. As a moderator I am supposed to enforce the will of the community as a whole and not the policies I deem appropriate, and for now the community has deemed those questions on-topic. So I won't run around and kill each and every ID question. However, this will not stop me trying to encourage more quality in this question category. I will try to bring poor ID questions to notice and enquire users for more detail. Likewise I will also resume the existing maintenance task of deleting old inactive ID questions, which has decreased in the past and which I have tried to help with recently by appropriate moderator flags. I will also never lose sight of the broader picture of the site's future and will address the matter of ID questions in more serious meta discussions if the situation seems to get worse.

What current policies do you believe are too strictly enforced (either by mods or the community)? Which do you believe are not enforced strictly enough?

In recent times I have begun to get more open to more subjective questions or even list questions to some degree. This doesn't mean I'd propose every kind of subjectively argumentative question, but I think sometimes people are a bit too fast in close-voting interesting and intriguing questions which might just be phrased a bit unluckily. I'd rather see more openness in this regard and more editing on those questions, may it even be accompanied by close-votes and reopen-votes after proper editing. There have been quite some questions which I happened to edit into reopenability but I'd like others to chime in there a bit. I also think that sometimes people flag as "not an answer" a bit too fast, at least I've seen that in the past, when 10kers had more insight into the flagging queue and I often had to cast "invalid flag"-flags. If something is a totally unreasonable or ungrounded answer that nevertheless tries to provide an answer, it is to be downvoted, but it is an answer. (Though, this might also come from a mere misunderstanding of the low quality review queue and it's admittedly misleading "Looks Ok" button.)

On the other hand I'd yet again come back to my pet topic and would like to see people voting more actively against poor identification questions, especially when I, in my possible future position as a moderator, will naturally step more to the background in situations that are not 100% clear-cut. Though, I also think that this has improved as of recently.

  • Well played, my friend, well played. – Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 Feb 10 '15 at 1:31
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    I have no time to read. but still upvoting since you are the only person here who hadn't made the text look ugly by bolding it. – Mr_Green Feb 10 '15 at 6:50
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Myself, Ankit Sharma , नाम तो सुना ही होगा (The name must have heard), and here are my answers:

As a moderator, your votes become binding. Actions you used to take like flagging, reviewing, closing, and deleting will take effect immediately without any input from any other users or moderators. How will you adapt the way you currently flag and vote to deal with this change?

Things are obviously going to change here, binding votes not going to be placed that frequently. Imposing my own point of view with binding vote is wrong but sometime it really needed. Complete utter crap and spam needed to be deleted and closed sooner but in case of doubt better to leave it on community.

While M&TV has a large userbase and many visitors, the meta participation is relatively low and discussions are usually held within a small active core group. Do you see this as a problem? If yes, how would you try to improve the situation as a moderator?

I agree, that its an issue. I always felt community bulletin should be more used for this purpose with feature and other mod related tags.

Sometime its better to bring users to meta discussion rather them long comment trail, specially in case of new users. Noticed important discussion rolled in chats, so better to pull it there too

How willing are you to commit time to this site every day to ensure that everything is seen by at least one mod in a relatively decent amount of time?

Movie and TV is a tab which always remain in my browser, I always check review bar, chat and new question multiple time in a day. And being in other timezone then majority of top user, I have unintentionally filled the time gap constraint of site moderation.

How you are going to handle spoiler complaints? People here have submitted many complaints about spoilers and a new user can give a big spoiler very clearly. So how are you going to handle this?

We have always allowed spoiler in Movies and TV just with the exception of the question title, Spoiler markup is variable decision case by case but title should be spoiler free for recent releases. So edit is the best solution here, edit away the spoiler from title and spoiler markup where necessary.

In what way do you feel that being a moderator will make you more effective as opposed to simply reaching 10k or 20k rep?

Binding vote, I didn't going to need 4 more vote to close or delete utter crap or straight deleting the spam and offensive answers.

Bringing meta post in front which get less limelight, trying to do interesting activities etc etc

How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

First approach will be to address him about his mistake calmly and making him realize his mistake but if he doesn't change them some serious step can be taken (depends by case to case). Good answer doesn't allow anyone to cross lines, such as abuse and personal targeting in not allowed.

How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

Conversation with the other mod is on top priority and understanding his point first, If he/she is completely wrong then making him realize that and reopening/reversal the step. But in case of doubt, better to put it in community discussion.

A new user has arrived and doesn't really understand the way the Stack Exchange system is supposed to work. They're complaining that people keep editing their posts and a roll back war has started on a question that they've asked. You need to step in and moderate the situation. What actions do you take?

Already have seen this and my approach will remain same, trying to address him how things go in here. In long discussion, convince him to come to chat and make him understand the things by sharing faqs and related meta discussions

This site generates a lot of identification questions. The general consensus for a while has been to keep them, but that we need to enforce some quality rules on them. What is your personal opinion on the identification questions we receive on this site?

I am neither in favour nor against it. It depends case by case, depends on quality and answerability. Very low quality question with unfavourable response from asker is closeable for sure but all ID should not be targeting for closer. If things go worse then will straight bring it in meta to discuss them.

What current policies do you believe are too strictly enforced (either by mods or the community)? Which do you believe are not enforced strictly enough?

I am currently not against of any policy, little feature change wish can not be considered as policy change.

  • It's somewhat bad form to have edited 2 people's answers for grammar/spelling when your own post is... well... Let's just say I abandonned the idea of doing the same to yours after I more or less re-wrote 80% of it. ;o) Edits here should be left to the original authors as they add/remove/restate their answers to the questions. – Johnny Bones Feb 15 '15 at 0:30
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    @JohnnyBones i just treated this same as any other meta post, yup i know my grammar can be a bit week due to its not being my primary language. And it was not done to offend anyone. – Ankit Sharma Feb 16 '15 at 7:03
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Hi. My name is Ian, and here are my answers:

As a moderator, your votes become binding. Actions you used to take like flagging, reviewing, closing, and deleting will take effect immediately without any input from any other users or moderators. How will you adapt the way you currently flag and vote to deal with this change?

As a pro-tem moderator this has been the position I've been in since the early days of the beta. My policy has always been to moderate with a light-touch, and in many cases allow the community to contribute to the moderation of the site rather than impose my own views. In the early days of the beta, the pro-tem moderators needed to be more assertive as there were fewer people with the necessary reputation, but nowadays this 'light-touch' is all that is needed. If I see a post that is clearly off-topic, unhelpful, or already gathered several close votes, I will add my own vote, but in many cases I will leave it for the community to decide.

While M&TV has a large userbase and many visitors, the meta participation is relatively low and discussions are usually held within a small active core group. Do you see this as a problem? If yes, how would you try to improve the situation as a moderator?

I do see this as a problem, and definitely an area that I should try to help improve. I've been reasonably frequent poster to meta, answering questions or using it as a forum to explain policy, but I've not been particularly good at encouraging more people to use it.

In future when something interesting comes up that would benefit from more discussion, I should be quicker to make and/or link to a meta-post and encouraging people to get more involved.

How willing are you to commit time to this site every day to ensure that everything is seen by at least one mod in a relatively decent amount of time?

I come to the site most if not every day.

How you are going to handle spoiler complaints? People here have submitted many complaints about spoilers and a new user can give a big spoiler very clearly. So how are you going to handle this?

I think I (like many regular users) am sensitive to spoilers in titles, especially of recent movies and quickly edit them to remove them. The important thing is to quickly remove the spoiler, and the user in question usually quickly learns from that example.

Spoilers in the post content is less important as the reader has chosen to view that. Spoiler markup should be kept to an absolute minimum as it is distracting to users - but would still be useful in situations of adding spoilers from another movie.

This has been the policy of all the pro-tem moderators and the regular users, if someone thinks this has been problematic, please do open a meta-post on the subject so we can revisit this.

In what way do you feel that being a moderator will make you more effective as opposed to simply reaching 10k or 20k rep?

This is a great question. I think that being a high-reputation user gives you almost all of the required privileges to assist with the running of the site. If I wasn't voted into the role, I would still help out where ever possible.

I think that the word of a 'diamond' moderator carries a little more weight in certain situations and I believe I've been able to use that to calm down some of the infrequent disputes that we've had on the site. I try to be diplomatic and fair, and that I am able to use the moderator status to good effect in these situations.

How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

First and foremost I would try to engage in the conversations to try to calm any arguments down. If I thought it was detrimental to the site or was unfair to other users I would attempt to have a private chat with them. It is hard to talk about this hypothetically as arguments could be mean anything from 'robust defence of their viewpoint' to 'rude or bullying'. In the latter case I would have no hesitation to clamp down on the behavior.

How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

When we had several active moderators on the site this happened from time to time. The key thing was that the moderators were respectful to each other and happy to point these out to each other. Particularly in the early days of the site, when we made more binding-vote decisions for the site, we had a private chat room where we could discuss these things out of the public gaze. Moderators are human and liable to make mistakes or change their mind. It was good to have others to discuss potentially controversial decisions. I am sure we can maintain that kind of open communication between us, and be prepared to admit mistakes and reverse decisions.

A new user has arrived and doesn't really understand the way the Stack Exchange system is supposed to work. They're complaining that people keep editing their posts and a roll back war has started on a question that they've asked. You need to step in and moderate the situation. What actions do you take?

I would engage with the new user and try to explain how the system works here, and fortunately there are a lot of help documents and meta-posts that can describe this. If the user persists in rolling back, unless there are significant other problems with their post, I would tend to finally side with the original author's preferences. I would explain to the people making edits that it would be beneficial for them to stop and allow the new user to experience the site and hopefully grow to understand how it works.

This site generates a lot of identification questions. The general consensus for a while has been to keep them, but that we need to enforce some quality rules on them. What is your personal opinion on the identification questions we receive on this site?

I am not a fan of identification questions at all, but I know there are a significant number of experienced users that love the challenge of answering them. By their very nature they are typically only useful to the original asker. However I believe that if allow them at all, I think we can maintain a lower standard of quality for them.

This may seem controversial, and I stress that I think we should encourage the users to put in as much detail in their question as possible. However if someone is struggling to remember enough detail to find the movie some other way, to close these questions for not having enough detail seems perverse.

Finally I think we can continue to delete those that have failed to gather any answers after 14 days.

This is likely to be something that all the moderators have an opinion on, and something that despite my personal opinion that I would be happy to apply the community's consensus on quality.

TL;DR - They are puzzles enjoyed by some of our users. If we allow them at all, lets not get too worried about the quality.

What current policies do you believe are too strictly enforced (either by mods or the community)? Which do you believe are not enforced strictly enough?

Not sure I can answer this one!

7

My name is Trish Ling, humble and hopeful Moderator candidate at your service.
* Curtsies *

As a moderator, your votes become binding. Actions you used to take like flagging, reviewing, closing, and deleting will take effect immediately without any input from any other users or moderators. How will you adapt the way you currently flag and vote to deal with this change?

I already take the time to think about each action I take, whether it's flagging, reviewing, closing, and deleting, and that wouldn't change. However, knowing that my action would become effect immediately would make me that more more cautious about the actions I take.

While M&TV has a large userbase and many visitors, the meta participation is relatively low and discussions are usually held within a small active core group. Do you see this as a problem? If yes, how would you try to improve the situation as a moderator?

Yeah, it does seems like participation in meta is low, and I have acknowledged in my nomination statement that I have only just begun to explore meta myself. I think one reason for this is that there isn't an obvious link to the meta M&TV site- I go to the Meta site by clicking on the "Featured on Meta" questions to the right. I'd probably try to help draw user's attention to the Meta site when appropriate.

How willing are you to commit time to this site every day to ensure that everything is seen by at least one mod in a relatively decent amount of time?

Oh, very willing indeed. :) I am already on this site every day, at least once a day, if not more, answering questions and going through the review queue. As a mod I know I'll have to commit even more time to this site.

How you are going to handle spoiler complaints? People here have submitted many complaints about spoilers and a new user can give a big spoiler very clearly. So how are you going to handle this?

For legitimate complaints, I would add spoiler markup where needed, and leave a comment for the (new) user to let them know of the proper practice/markup for spoilers. For a movie/episode that has already been out for a suitable length of time (i.e. not brand new), spoilers should be expected, and the spoiler markup may not be absolutely necessary- maybe at least a spoiler warning could suffice.

In what way do you feel that being a moderator will make you more effective as opposed to simply reaching 10k or 20k rep?

Having that moderator diamond next to my name (and title) would mean that I am very aware of the responsibilities and duties (and the honor!) expected of me as a moderator. Having 10K or 20k rep, while impressive doesn't carry that same connotation.

How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

I would try to make that user aware of the argument/flags and how they are detrimental to the site and to his/her own reputation. If his/her comments are truly disruptive, and/or are not contributing to question/answer or otherwise breaks the rules, I would remove them as necessary.

How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

If said question doesn't meet the rules for closing/deletion, I might reopen the question. After all, I can't just reopen a question just because I feel it shouldn't have been closed. If it needs more details or improvement, I might try to leave a comment for the asker so that they might improve it enough to reopen. I would probably also try to contact this other mod to find out his/her reasons for closing the question if they didn't leave a comment outside of the standard one.

A new user has arrived and doesn't really understand the way the Stack Exchange system is supposed to work. They're complaining that people keep editing their posts and a roll back war has started on a question that they've asked. You need to step in and moderate the situation. What actions do you take?

I would try to make the new user aware of the rules (why people are editing their posts) and try to reach a diplomatic solution. If the user refuses to comply, I would have to take action accordingly, including an additional roll-back to the version I feel is the best one, locking the post for a short time to prevent further rollbacks, and even the suspension of said user if the behavior is especially bad or disruptive- but only if it really gets out of hand.

This site generates a lot of identification questions. The general consensus for a while has been to keep them, but that we need to enforce some quality rules on them. What is your personal opinion on the identification questions we receive on this site?

As I mentioned in my nomination statement, my specialty (for answering) is identification questions. For the most part they are good, and users provide enough detail to get an answer, whether by memory or Google-Fu. However there are also quite a few questions, especially by new users, where very little info is given, and answers can be quite hard to find or there are too many possibilities. In these circumstances, prodding the user via comments to provided more detail can be useful, and of course closing it for not enough detail until the user edits it happens as well. Enforcing quality rules is a great idea, and one way I have seen others do it (and how I do it sometimes) is to comment on a user's question with either advice or a link to the site FAQs. In fact, the problem I have with Movie IDs more often is that since they are often asked by new users, these users often disappear before they accept an answer or even can confirm that the ID is correct at all.

What current policies do you believe are too strictly enforced (either by mods or the community)? Which do you believe are not enforced strictly enough?

Hmm, this one requires more thinking...lemme get back to you guys. ^_^

  • Like your constructive comments on questions you've voted to close. – Bob Stein Feb 9 '15 at 20:48
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My name is atticae and here is a large wall of text. I kid of course, I will try to keep this as short as possible:

As a moderator, your votes become binding. Actions you used to take like flagging, reviewing, closing, and deleting will take effect immediately without any input from any other users or moderators. How will you adapt the way you currently flag and vote to deal with this change?

I always try to vote and flag responsibly as a normal user (as attested by my 100% helpful flag rate), but as a moderator you have an additional responsibility as your actions become effective without supervision. In cases that I think are borderline, I will let the community decide to find their own voice instead of trying to enforce my own. On questions however that are clearly off-topic or close-worthy for another reason, I will use my binding vote to keep the site clean and lighten the workload for the community, while trying to explain my reasons as clear as possible, especially to new users.

While M&TV has a large userbase and many visitors, the meta participation is relatively low and discussions are usually held within a small active core group. Do you see this as a problem? If yes, how would you try to improve the situation as a moderator?

I see this as a big problem, both for meta as for the site itself. Decisions on meta become law for the site, so they should represent the community's opinion. If the activity on meta is low, the rules don't have the necessary legitimacy as they may not represent how the majority thinks about an issue. So getting more users on meta is a major concern for me, but not an easy task. By regularly promoting important meta discussions, both on the site, in chat and in the upcoming blog I hope to change the situation. Also I think it's important to introduce new users to meta as well early on, so that they realize how SE works. I would do this by encouraging them to visit meta if there is anything they have a problem with, so the community can help them.

How willing are you to commit time to this site every day to ensure that everything is seen by at least one mod in a relatively decent amount of time?

I basically live here most of the days, so activity should not be a problem. When at a computer, I alway have two tabs open in the browser, one with M&TV and one with the Chat, so not only would I be able to see things quickly and act if needed, you also will be able to talk to me directly if there is any problem.

How you are going to handle spoiler complaints? People here have submitted many complaints about spoilers and a new user can give a big spoiler very clearly. So how are you going to handle this?

This has been an important issue for which we with found a consensus on meta. We, the community, decided that spoilers should be allowed to not water down the quality of the site, but hidden from plain sight wherever possible. I would enforce this policy by encouraging users to keep their question titles free of spoilers and where necessary improve the title myself, so that anyone can browse the site spoiler-free as long as they don't open a question for a movie they haven't yet seen.

In what way do you feel that being a moderator will make you more effective as opposed to simply reaching 10k or 20k rep?

As a moderator, the little diamond gives you the authority to speak on behalf of the community, settle disputes and solve problems quicker. Also you are much faster in the day to day tasks of cleaning up the site, because you don't need a vote of 5 people to handle clean-cut cases. I would also use the mod powers to help with administrative tasks that nobody likes to do but are still important, like cleaning up tags and turning comment-answers by new users into actual comments.

How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

I would invite him to chat and try to find out what the problem is. Maybe he does not understand the SE culture or he has communication problems based on a language issue. I would try to explain the situation to him and encourage him to improve his behavior. If the problem persists, I would give him a warning and a finally a time-out to think about things.

How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

I would approach the mod personally, discussing his view on the matter and then finding a solution together. If we have opposing views, I would open a discussion on meta to let the community decide.

A new user has arrived and doesn't really understand the way the Stack Exchange system is supposed to work. They're complaining that people keep editing their posts and a roll back war has started on a question that they've asked. You need to step in and moderate the situation. What actions do you take?

I would point him to the very good help center we have. If that doesn't help, i would invite him to a chat room and explain how the SE system works. If he continues the rollback war, I would lock the question until the situation has resolved.

This site generates a lot of identification questions. The general consensus for a while has been to keep them, but that we need to enforce some quality rules on them. What is your personal opinion on the identification questions we receive on this site?

I have never hidden the fact that I am not in favor of ID questions on the site. I think that the quiz-style of those questions does not fit well with the rest of our site and that ID would be much better of in a separate SE site with a pure focus on identification of movies, shows, music, images, games etc. That being said, I will respect any decision the community makes on that behalf and enforce it regardless of my personal opinion.

What current policies do you believe are too strictly enforced (either by mods or the community)? Which do you believe are not enforced strictly enough?

I think we have found a good balance lately on what to close and what to allow, so I don't have any immediate concerns on anything being to strict/not strict enough. One of my major concern is that we at the very least get rid of ID questions with almost no information, but they are already being closed fast lately.

Thanks for reading all this! If you think I would be a good choice for representing you and the community, please take a second to vote for me in the election. I promise to give my very best.

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As my moniker suggests, I’m Paul. I’m looking to be one of your next moderators. Please read through my answers to the following questions. I hope you find some smidgen of a reason in here to vote for me as one of your new moderators.

As a moderator, your votes become binding. Actions you used to take like flagging, reviewing, closing, and deleting will take effect immediately without any input from any other users or moderators. How will you adapt the way you currently flag and vote to deal with this change?

As a moderator, sometimes you need to lay back a little bit and see what the community thinks. Often times, problems with posts are blaringly obvious. These posts are easy to deal with. Other times, not so much. If I see something which I believe is questionable, the easiest way to handle it is to let the community handle it … we have a great userbase who can decide if something is not right with it. If four others have cast a close vote, I have no issue agreeing with them. It doesn't mean I’d let something languish. I can make a tough decision if needed. Jumping on a bandwagon is not what I call making a tough decision, though.

While M&TV has a large userbase and many visitors, the meta participation is relatively low and discussions are usually held within a small active core group. Do you see this as a problem? If yes, how would you try to improve the situation as a moderator?

I have always viewed the meta site as a place to air grievances and to get resolution where you believe there is a problem (with posts or with functionality). The use of the meta side does not have to be higher or lower than the main site for it to be functional. If there is an issue, go there and get it fixed. With the advent of the Topic Challenge and possible Blog pages, the meta becomes even less of a used site. I’m not positive encouraging beyond what it’s meant would produce any better results on the main site, which is actually what is important to people looking for answers to their Movie & TV questions. I can see the importance of the meta, though. This is the reason why there is a small place on the right hand side of the page where new meta questions show up. The only other way to promote it that I can see would be in the chat, but the people who use meta are probably the ones on chat as well. This is not a question which can easily be answered.

How willing are you to commit time to this site every day to ensure that everything is seen by at least one mod in a relatively decent amount of time?

I do it now (and have been for over the past year plus) … so not an issue.

How are you going to handle spoiler complaints? People here have submitted many complaints about spoilers and a new user can give a big spoiler very clearly. So how are you going to handle this?

Spoilers are what they are. I believe as long as there isn't something in the title, there really isn't a big issue. I thought I read on the site somewhere that spoilers are a fact of the site, so not to get too upset by seeing something you didn't want to see. I believe most people are contentious enough to post some type of “spoiler alert” announcement at the top of their questions. If they aren't, it can easily be added, with a note to the poster as to why it was added. I believe these issues are very easy to overcome. I also believe that no matter how much we try and explain this to the user base, there will always be people who will complain (you cannot please everyone … some people just don’t want to be pleased). As a moderator, you do what you can to help the community. If it takes a spoiler to answer a question properly, there should not be an issue there.

In what way do you feel that being a moderator will make you more effective as opposed to simply reaching 10k or 20k rep?

Actually, probably not much more effective. At the chance of sounding conceded, I believe I already know and am doing what I need to be doing as a moderator for the most part. I'm sure there are other tools which are available to the moderator, which we as the userbase will never know about. As it states in A Theory of Moderation, "Moderators are human exception handlers" ... Moderators are here to clean-up/clear-up what the community as a whole cannot. Moderators are here to help the site run smoothly. They can ask/answer a question once in a while, too ... nothing wrong with that :D

How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

Obviously, any SE site needs good content to remain viable. You cannot just arbitrarily ax someone from the site because they create drama. As a moderator you have to weigh out the differences between what is useful and what is not. If the drama becomes more troublesome than the good answers, you need to take action. Your best bet is to, at first, give gentle guidance as to proper behavior and etiquette. The “Our Model” section on the Help Center page says to be nice. If someone cannot abide by this after gentle persuasion, I'm sure there are tools available to the moderators which would allow them to suspend someone’s account for a period of time. If all else fails, I'm sure that there is far worse which can happen to a user's account. I would hate to go down that road, but believe the civility of the site comes first. What good is it if this one person is pushing people away in the process of giving good answers? One person in-and-of themselves do not make a site. The SE sites require a community. Keep the peace to promote that community.

How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

I don’t know exactly what tools are available to mods, but would assume you would be able to contact one another on some backside channel (whether that be a chat or email). Discussion about the question would be in order. If they still believe it requires to be shut down, I think this is the reason there are three mods, with one to break the tie. Hopefully, it never gets to that point. Hopefully, there is communication between mods which would allow for a decision to be made. If only one mod was available when the decision is made, then I’d be good with it … hopefully with the same latitude given me if the shoe were on the other foot.

A new user has arrived and doesn't really understand the way the Stack Exchange system is supposed to work. They're complaining that people keep editing their posts and a roll back war has started on a question that they've asked. You need to step in and moderate the situation. What actions do you take?

Communication can work wonders. Showing them how to write a good question or to thoroughly present and answer is an easy thing. Point out to them the things which the community is saying are wrong, because ultimately the community is probably right. The Community, however, needs to be nice in their dealings with the newbie. We were all new once. We need to remember that we can sometimes expect too much from a new person. Be kind, gentle, and patient. If you cannot be, then you are part of the problem. In that case, the newbie may not be at fault. You need to take each situation as they come. Hopefully it will end with all being happy and the newbie learning what it means to be on an SE site, providing valuable insights and answers or asking fruitful questions which can prove useful to others.

This site generates a lot of identification questions. The general consensus for a while has been to keep them, but that we need to enforce some quality rules on them. What is your personal opinion on the identification questions we receive on this site?

Often I see very poorly written ID questions. I try to comment to coax the individual into giving more information or making the question clearer. If that doesn't work, there is a 14 day rule setup to auto delete ID questions which don’t get an answer (does that include ones without accepted answers?? I don’t know). I see a lot of people jump on poor ID questions which are an hour old to close them. Sometimes I can see it. Most of the time I cannot. To me, this doesn't give the person enough time to come back and reformat, add to their question, or provide the simple little things which could help them get their question answered. I think this goes back to the “be nice” portion, where we need to be gentle, especially with newbies. Give them a chance and let’s see what they have for us. They may surprise us! There is a reason people ask an identification question ... to figure out something which has been bugging them. We can choose to help them get a good answer, or we can shoot them down in a blaze of glory. If we do the latter, they may never come back ... not only to our site, but maybe to the entirety of SE. That's not something I'd care to see. Ultimately though, we can only lead those who ask questions to ask better questions. If they refuse to come back and help clarify, then those questions need to go away. I think the 14 day rule can do that quite nicely.

What current policies do you believe are too strictly enforced (either by mods or the community)? Which do you believe are not enforced strictly enough?

I have reread this question over several times hoping something would come to me, but it hasn't. I cannot think of anything where I believe a policy is getting over/under enforced. I like how SE works. I like the model. I like the format. I just plain like it. I have been a moderator on several regular internet forums before. The whining and crying which goes on there just doesn't show up here that much. I like the fact we should include reference when possible. This lends credence to what is written. We can expect what is written to have a higher value to it then what you'd find on an internet forum, where opinions abound and facts are a rare thing. We are self-policing, taking care of business as we go. It isn't that often where I see a policy has to be enforced. If they are getting enforced, it happens so quietly, the sanctity of the site remains. It’s just a great place to help other people. The longer I’m here, the more I like it. This is the main reason I want to be a moderator for the site … it's just plain awesome. I'm surprised more people didn't sign up to be in the mix. Hopefully I'm one of those elected so I can help keep the pleasantness alive.

Thank you for reading my diatribe. I hope it wasn't too long or arduous to read. As I stated, it's a great community. I'm sure whomever wins the elections will deserve the diamond after they name … I hope you'll make mine one of those :D

  • 2
    "The use of the meta side does not have to be higher or lower than the main site for it to be functional." Not sure what you mean by that, the activity on meta is nowhere near the main page. "If there is an issue, go there and get it fixed." Well yeah, but the problem is that if you raise an issue there, you will get very little input from the community right now, and many votes on site "laws" have too little participation to be conclusive. – magnattic Feb 11 '15 at 15:40
  • @atticae ... who in the meta actually takes care of problems? The Mods do. Most issues I've seen brought up there aren't ones which need to have a popularity vote on to come to resolution. You plead your case and a mod either rejects it or takes care of it. The voting which may occur on a thread you start may influence a decision, but ultimately only the Mods can make something happen. So, does the meta require participation for the main site to be healthy? In my approximation, no it does not. – Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 Feb 12 '15 at 1:53
  • First of all sorry, I didn't mean to abduct your Q&A with a discussion. :) I just thought your answer was interesting because it was pretty different from the rest (and the way I see it). How about we move this to chat? – magnattic Feb 12 '15 at 11:35
  • @atticae ... Thanks again for giving me a chance to explain things in the election chat. This whole experience has be very rewarding for me. – Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 Feb 12 '15 at 12:24
2

MattD here, allow me to answer some of your questions.

As a moderator, your votes become binding. Actions you used to take like flagging, reviewing, closing, and deleting will take effect immediately without any input from any other users or moderators. How will you adapt the way you currently flag and vote to deal with this change?

I can't really think of how I would handle these things in a radically different way, but I would exercise a bit more caution, especially in how quickly I might be tempted to close something. Observing the downvote count and comments would be one way, but also making sure those downvots and comments align with current policy on the site. Were I to be completely unsure, I'd keep an eye on flags and close votes along with the reasons why. Overall, I don't think being a mod will drastically change how I vote, but it would likely make me a tad more cautious given how binding such an action would be.

While M&TV has a large userbase and many visitors, the meta participation is relatively low and discussions are usually held within a small active core group. Do you see this as a problem? If yes, how would you try to improve the situation as a moderator?

No, I don't see this as a problem, at least not entirely. The site has only recently graduated, and now that it has we should (hopefully) see more exposure as the months and years tick by. Having a core group of users can honestly be a good thing, as they're the ones who care most about the site. However, it's when those users try to use their well established place within the community as a means to upend the opinions and input of others that it becomes a problem. Overall it's pretty much the saying: you can lead a horse to water, but you can't make him drink. We can advertise Meta M&TV, as we have by requesting a bot for it in the main chatroom that, I feel, has increased traffic to Meta M&TV. There's also links to top Meta M&TV questions that's clearly visible towards the top of the main landing page. While I would love to see more input from different users, in the end I can't make them, and as long as those providing most of the input don't grow some sort of ego about it, I'm fine with that.

How willing are you to commit time to this site every day to ensure that everything is seen by at least one mod in a relatively decent amount of time?

Pretty darn willing. I'm here most days, and even use the site via the mobile app when possible. I frequently check it when I need little breaks at work, so I feel I'd hit it often enough to be an effective moderator for this site.

How you are going to handle spoiler complaints? People here have submitted many complaints about spoilers and a new user can give a big spoiler very clearly. So how are you going to handle this?

My general policy is to not be a stickler for spoilers. Should a movie have a spoiler in the title, I may try to edit the title to make it less spoilery, but in the end, people need to realize they're on a website devoted to movies. I'm not going to ask the writers at /Film or AICN or any other movie site to stop publishing details about the new Star Wars movie, because there are people that actually want to know lots of details and/or don't care about knowing everything going in. We live in that kind of world now, and while I wish it were easy to still remain surprised, it's just not as easy nowadays. Now, the title ruins part of a movie? I may look to edit the title to make it less spoilery. Should the spoiler be in the body of the question? I'm not going to worry about it. The question should be properly tagged with the title of the movie it's about, and the viewer can clearly see that when they happen upon the question. Question is about a movie you haven't seen yet but plan to? Might want to avoid reading it. My job and that of other users on this site is not to protect you from knowing things about movies before you see them, it's to answer questions based on those big moments when necessary.

In what way do you feel that being a moderator will make you more effective as opposed to simply reaching 10k or 20k rep?

Well before the site graduated you simply needed 4k rep for all those lovely powers, so I've already had them and likely used them to some capacity. I feel being a moderator will simply return powers to me that I already had until a few weeks ago. The site was kind enough to trust me with them in beta, and no problems arose from me having those powers (even if they weren't as instantaneous as they would be as a mod), so in the end I feel I'd do fine with them. I'd be more effective as I'd get to use them immediately, but in the end I don't see it being such a huge leap in power as to turn me into a supervillain on the site.

How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

I'd give them ample warning to stop being so argumentative, as the comments section is not intended to carry on a conversation and is very public facing. They want to discuss a matter in more detail? They can come to the main chatroom, or create their own chatroom if they have enough rep. I'd give people enough of an opportunity to improve themselves, and if they don't? A more punishing solution may need to be implemented, up to and including swinging the ban hammer. I don't like to do it, I want people here to ask good questions and generate good discussion in chat because I love talking about movies, but I'm not going to sit around and let someone poison a site that many of us have worked pretty hard to get to this point.

How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

I'd try to discuss it with them if I felt it was an egregous error, but unless the community felt slighted by a mod exercising their powers inappropriately, it's likely something I'd leave alone.

A new user has arrived and doesn't really understand the way the Stack Exchange system is supposed to work. They're complaining that people keep editing their posts and a roll back war has started on a question that they've asked. You need to step in and moderate the situation. What actions do you take?

I inform the user of the appropriate sections of the FAQ that can address the problems they're creating, and ask that they review them and understand we aren't doing this to be mean to a new user, but to maintain a certain level of quality on the site. That isn't to say they're generating bad content, so to speak, but there are people here who have been using the site for a very long time and know the rules to such an extent that it's easy to quickly find problems and correct them. Edits should not be taken personally, as they're primarily done to help maintain overall quality, and checks are in place to make sure no one is drastically editing a question to possibly alter the asker's original intent of the question. Should they persist in their actions, I'd likely discuss it with the other mods, and more binding action may need to be taken.

This site generates a lot of identification questions. The general consensus for a while has been to keep them, but that we need to enforce some quality rules on them. What is your personal opinion on the identification questions we receive on this site?

While I agree ID can be annoying, they're fair questions to be asked here. We don't allow users bellow a certain reputation level into the chatrooms, and further they may be asking about a movie that actually sounds rally cool. We have guidelines in place for what they need to include to allow their question to stay, and even if their question is closed that doesn't mean that's the end of it. They'd like us to identify a movie, but the community shouldn't be expected to spin their wheels trying to identify, "That movie with the brown eyes guy who robs a bank and gets away with it." Given that, I feel ID should stay, but definitely needs to be monitored and dealt with quickly so as to not drag down the quality of the site.

What current policies do you believe are too strictly enforced (either by mods or the community)? Which do you believe are not enforced strictly enough?

As my fellow candidates have indicated, I honestly can't think of any glaring or egregous examples of policies I don't like here, nor can I think of any that aren't enforced enough. We've helped to build a good community here that's pretty fair and balanced.

Thank you one and all for reading this, and I hope you'll all vote accordingly. There's a lot of excellent candidates here, and I feel that whomever we end up with will be the best possible choice in the end.

0

Hey, there! My name is John DiBella, aka Johnny Bones.

I would like to preface this by saying, thank you for your consideration. Please note, there are no "stock answers" here. No empty campaign promises. I'm not answering with what I think you want to hear, it's coming from my heart. I'm a straight-shooter, I don't believe in BS. If you agree with my answers, I'd appreciate your vote.

Here are my answers:

As a moderator, your votes become binding. Actions you used to take like flagging, reviewing, closing, and deleting will take effect immediately without any input from any other users or moderators. How will you adapt the way you currently flag and vote to deal with this change?

Personally, I don't flag or vote to close/delete now without serious thought. I think a vote for those actions requires a level head and an understanding of what this site stands for, whether you're a user or a moderator. As such, I don't feel my actions will differ at all should I become a moderator.

While M&TV has a large userbase and many visitors, the meta participation is relatively low and discussions are usually held within a small active core group. Do you see this as a problem? If yes, how would you try to improve the situation as a moderator?

I don't see it as a problem, to be honest. You can't make someone want to be involved on the level that Meta discussions happen. People decide on their own if they want to go to that site. Anyone who says differently is just pandering for a vote. I will say this, however. Meta is a different animal. Votes are used differently. As a moderator, I would urge more participation than just votes. I'd like to see people offer reasons for downvotes and have expanded discussions.

How willing are you to commit time to this site every day to ensure that everything is seen by at least one mod in a relatively decent amount of time?

I already stop by on an almost daily basis, as I work from home and am heavily involved (from a user standpoint) on the Stack Overflow site. My weekends, oddly enough, are largely composed of watching movies. Popping in on Saturdays and Sundays wouldn't be that difficult at all.

How you are going to handle spoiler complaints? People here have submitted many complaints about spoilers and a new user can give a big spoiler very clearly. So how are you going to handle this?

A simple solution is to use the Spoiler tag (a greater than sign (>) followed by an exclamation mark(!)) and edit questions that contain spoilers. If a particular user exhibits a pattern of adding Spoiler-type questions then I might take some action, but I've never seen that happen here.

In what way do you feel that being a moderator will make you more effective as opposed to simply reaching 10k or 20k rep?

I think a moderator is looked at with a little more reverence than a person with 10k or 20k rep. They command a little more respect. Their comments carry a little more weight. I think that's important when you're trying to direct conversations or suggesting site changes.

How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

I would try to get at the reason why they were generating these flags. I tend to be a very reasonable person, and have always been somewhat of a "peacekeeper", and have generated an enormous amount of good will in my department at work. I'm confident I can get to the base of the issue, and hopefully get the offender to change his attitude.

How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

I would have a discussion with the mod to determine what their underlying reasoning was, and explain my reasons for wanting to keep a question open. I'm reasonable, I have to assume another moderator is reasonable, I'm sure we can come to a conclusion that satisfies everyone involved. I'm not the type of person who believes I'm infallable, so it's perfectly acceptable to believe I can change my mind based on new information provided by the mod.

A new user has arrived and doesn't really understand the way the Stack Exchange system is supposed to work. They're complaining that people keep editing their posts and a roll back war has started on a question that they've asked. You need to step in and moderate the situation. What actions do you take?

I would look at the string of edits and figure out which person is following the rules of SE. Then, I would explain to the person in the wrong why the edits were made (either to roll back or retain the edits), and why their actions were not in line with SE's goals for the site.

This site generates a lot of identification questions. The general consensus for a while has been to keep them, but that we need to enforce some quality rules on them. What is your personal opinion on the identification questions we receive on this site?

As stated in this question: Country Of Origin should be a required field; I believe there are some minimum requirements that we should enforce or encourage with these questions. Approximate year seen, Country of origin, Genre... There are a few bits of information that woul dmake identification less of a guessing game, and these should be part of the question.

What current policies do you believe are too strictly enforced (either by mods or the community)? Which do you believe are not enforced strictly enough?

I think the mods do a fine job. Arguments are at a minimum, questions are closed when appropriate, people are helpful and give a good amount of guidance when some folks post answers that aren't really answers. I would merely do my best to make sure everyone continues to act in a similar manner as the site continues to grow.

0

System Down here (late to the party as always)!

As a moderator, your votes become binding. Actions you used to take like flagging, reviewing, closing, and deleting will take effect immediately without any input from any other users or moderators. How will you adapt the way you currently flag and vote to deal with this change?

Being a final arbitrator carries a lot of responsibility with it. I'm asking you to hand me the Big Guns. In return, I promise that except in extreme cases (spam and content that does not belong in our community) I will exercise extreme caution before clicking the trigger. I will give each case at least a couple of days for both sides to present their reasoning.

While M&TV has a large userbase and many visitors, the meta participation is relatively low and discussions are usually held within a small active core group. Do you see this as a problem? If yes, how would you try to improve the situation as a moderator?

It is a problem. I see it as a problem of visibility. Most users don't know that Meta exists. I certainly didn't know about it when I was newbie. My answer is to redirect to Meta as much as possible, either to open questions or long settled ones.

How willing are you to commit time to this site every day to ensure that everything is seen by at least one mod in a relatively decent amount of time?

I already visit here every working day (don't tell my bosses!), and can even be seen her during the weekend. The availability of SE on mobile has definitely boosted my attendance levels.

How you are going to handle spoiler complaints? People here have submitted many complaints about spoilers and a new user can give a big spoiler very clearly. So how are you going to handle this?

Titles should be spoiler free with no exception. Answers should base how much spoilers they hide on the question itself and the poster's level of familiarity with the work. Questions are a bit more problematic and nuanced, and will probably have to be judged on a case to case basis. Factors such as the age of the material and how truly "spoilery" it is should be considered.

In what way do you feel that being a moderator will make you more effective as opposed to simply reaching 10k or 20k rep?

For most cases it shouldn't make too much of a problem. However, in the extreme case as outlined above and cases of obviously low quality content it would make cleaning up the site more expeditious.

How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

Monitor closely. If the user becomes too disruptive in a way that threatens the quality of the site's content, then an intervention has to be held. I would ask for their side of the story. Find if a compromise can somehow be reached. If it becomes clear that the disruptive behavior is not going to be remedied only then should the unfortunate possibility of stricter measures be considered.

How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

A discussion with that mod has to be started first. Perhaps their reasoning can convince me as well, or vice versa. If after that discussion both of us stick to our gun, I would ask the third mod to arbitrate and be the deciding vote.

A new user has arrived and doesn't really understand the way the Stack Exchange system is supposed to work. They're complaining that people keep editing their posts and a roll back war has started on a question that they've asked. You need to step in and moderate the situation. What actions do you take?

First I have to be very understanding. SE's format is quite unique, and most web users have never encountered anything similar. A visit to the "tour" is first suggested, along with the promise of answering any questions the new user might have. The new user's activity is then monitored. If they deviate from the site's rules then an expanded comment is issued describing why the edit/close was done without an air of authority or condescension.

This site generates a lot of identification questions. The general consensus for a while has been to keep them, but that we need to enforce some quality rules on them. What is your personal opinion on the identification questions we receive on this site?

I love them! They remain my favorite types of questions in all the SE's I frequent. However, we do have to be mindful of quality issues. Questions with obvious quality issues are to be put on hold, but the OP has to be reminded that the hold can be lifted if those issues are resolved.

What current policies do you believe are too strictly enforced (either by mods or the community)? Which do you believe are not enforced strictly enough?

Too strict: Trivia questions. The claim that they provide no benefit to the viewing experience is highly subjective. While some trivia questions that have nothing to do with the viewing experience (such as merchandise or names of songs) should be closed, other should be allowed.

No strict enough: can't think of any to be quite honest.

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