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Is it right to answer your own question within few minutes without even waiting for response from users?

Maybe I am wrong but I think questions with the tag like are not to be self-answered.

For example take this case . Because if you know the movie then why ask to identify it? And if you know the answer, you can at least wait for an hour for the sake of sportsmanship.

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    Bah "Identify this movie" questions are too localized anyway. – Robert Harvey May 3 '12 at 1:57
  • @RobertHarvey That is also a point to consider in this case. – Tablemaker May 3 '12 at 2:04
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It has always been an SE policy to Ask and answer your own questions.

Within a few minutes is just a quantifier for some things. However it is considered a bit distasteful on the network when you do this for everything you have without at least voting for other questions and answers and providing your own content on other users questions.

In the grand scheme of policy this is fine network wide. I just have a feeling that because of past contributions from this user on other SE sites that it got a little out of hand in the comment section (which has now been purged, and the post locked).

There is no game here, and there is no sportsmanship to be upheld except for another site wide policy which is Be Nice. If you see some troubling behaviour from a user or something that concerns you flag it for moderator attention

The global goal of SE as a whole is to Make the internet a better place.

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  • I never saw the comments. That's hardly fair. My question also contributed to the content of this site. After I was told the answer in IRC, what was I supposed to do? Where does the site policy say that I need to wait for someone to tell me what I already know? – Evan Carroll May 3 '12 at 16:42
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    @EvanCarroll But asking a question where the answer only helps you but you already know the answer and posting it yourself? That's just trolling. From NickC's answer pretty much sums it up. – Tablemaker May 3 '12 at 16:47
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    I didn't ask the question when I already knew the answer. I've already explained that. I asked the question then someone on IRC told me the answer; I was left with making the best of the situation. – Evan Carroll May 3 '12 at 16:49
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Is it right to answer your own question within few minutes without even waiting for response from users?

Yup, self-answering immediately (i.e., treating SE sites as blogs and just posting stuff without actually having a question) was encouraged by Jeff earlier this year. Therefore, it is perfectly acceptable, though you may have to adjust your perception of what the site is and how it works.

Maybe I am wrong but I think questions with the tag like identify-this-movie are not to be self-answered.

You are correct.

For example take this case. Because if you know the movie then why ask to identify it? And if you know the answer, you can at least wait for an hour for the sake of sportsmanship.

While SE sites are, or at least were Q/A sites, by encouraging immediate self-answering, Jeff has expanded their format to include generic reference posts. The sportsmanship part is irrelevant because identify questions do not fit this encyclopedia aspect.

Identify questions tend to be based on what the particular asker remembers and while most people will probably remember one or two items, most people will have different memories of movies or shows.

As such, it is fine to ask for help find something that you are trying identify. However, posting it solely for the sake of posting it, even under the pretense of providing the answer for future visitors is not useful. Even if somebody were to try to identify the same movie/show, it unlikely that they will be using the same search terms, and so will probably still not find the page.

Posting other kinds of information for the sake of posterity on the other hand makes sense because people trying to find that information will usually end up using the right combination of keywords to land on the page.

Of course I am talking in generalities and there are always exceptions to each case.

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  • Now that question is even deleted......anyways thanx for sharing ur point of view – Ankit Sharma Dec 8 '12 at 8:17
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Point #2 of Jeff Atwood's SO blog post on "guessing game" questions:

2. Guessing game questions don’t help others

Because these questions are based on vague, broad, half-remembered descriptions, it is unlikely anyone else will be able to find them through a web search. I have a difficult time imagining how you’d construct a web search, either on Google or via Stack Exchange’s built-in search, to find something that you can’t fully articulate. What’s even worse is that these questions, by their very nature, will contain a bunch of broad, speculative “maybe it’s like…” catch-all terms that are likely to trip up future visitors who end up there by accident.

...

The goal of Stack Exchange is not to construct un-findable single-serving questions that only help one person, but that’s exactly what guessing game questions tend to do.

A guessing game question is especially unlikely to help anyone else when it is not a definition (like a word request) but a tiny part of a movie.

Jeff says:

But after a year of observing these guessing game questions grow and spread to multiple sites with similar effects, I no longer believe that the slight benefit of these questions outweighs the many negatives.

I tend to agree, these questions should probably go altogether.

But asking a question where the answer only helps you but you already know the answer and posting it yourself?

That's just trolling.

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    I didn't ask the question when I already knew the answer. I knew the answer shortly after asking it, and figured it would help others and save time to contribute that answer back on the search engine indexed site. I also think it is incredibly naive (like most things Jeff says) to assume that I would be only one ever looking for the name of a movie that contained the epic scene in question. – Evan Carroll May 3 '12 at 16:44

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