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Although rare, occasionally someone will say or do something without intention which just happens to be very funny, or clever, or otherwise notable.

Just as it can happen to anyone, this could also happen to a comedian.

I became aware of something that involved a comedian, and am unsure if they did it intentionally (i.e. as a joke), or if it just happened coincidentally.

Would a question along the lines of "did (person) saying (possible joke) do so intentionally?" be on topic?

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    If that line is said in a TV show or a movie, and your question can be answered with reputable sources, I can't see any reason for it to be off-topic. It also depends on how you phrase the question.
    – A J Mod
    Oct 4 '21 at 13:49
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The number one problem I see with this is whether or not it is provable. If there is a script to the show/movie and the joke is in the script, then that is provably intentional.

If the joke was an ad-lib in an otherwise scripted thing, then that was probably intentional and most definitely intentional on the part of the director or producers to leave it in.

If the thing (show, special, movie, whatever) is not scripted, but is something like stand-up and if the comedian's normal routine contains either the exact same joke, or remarkably similar material, I would assume the average viewer would also assume that it was intentional.

But, anything else? How could we say, with certainty, that it was or was not intentional? Then the question could have two answers, equally plausible, neither of which is more or less true than the other. This is a bad, and perhaps closeable, question.

The main thing is, if it was part of the script, or a normal part of the comedian's routine, then the question might still face down-votes at the least, as some community members might view the questioner as not having performed due diligence or research before asking.

If I've completely misunderstood your line of reasoning, then you might have to give us a concrete example to go on.

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